Category Archives: References

The Power of Peirce’s Thought : 3

Re: Stephen Rose There are reasons why I felt compelled to stand back from the picture that others were painting — of opposing personal styles in the creative process and also in the wider intellectual landscape — and to seek … Continue reading

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The Power of Peirce’s Thought : 2

Re: Kirsti Määttänen You give a good description of the encounter with uncertainty, that unsettled state of mind that irks a person to inquire after new grounds of belief.  Viewed in biological perspective, it is only natural that evolution associates … Continue reading

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The Power of Peirce’s Thought : 1

I often wonder that more people do not avail themselves of the power of Peirce’s thought.  “What are they afraid of?” I ask myself.  I find myself asking it that way because there really does seem to be a persistent … Continue reading

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Two Ideals

Two ideals are struggling for supremacy in American life today: one the industrial ideal, dominating thru the supremacy of commercialism, which subordinates the worker to the product and the machine; the other, the ideal of democracy, the ideal of the … Continue reading

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C.S. Peirce • Of Triadic Being

Selection from C.S. Peirce, “Some Amazing Mazes, Fourth Curiosity” (c. 1909) Of triadic Being the multitude of forms is so terrific that I have usually shrunk from the task of enumerating them; and for the present purpose such an enumeration would … Continue reading

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C.S. Peirce • Logic as Semiotic

Selection from C.S. Peirce, “Ground, Object, and Interpretant” (c. 1897) Logic, in its general sense, is, as I believe I have shown, only another name for semiotic (σημειωτική), the quasi-necessary, or formal, doctrine of signs.  By describing the doctrine as … Continue reading

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C.S. Peirce • The Reality of Thirdness

Selections from C.S. Peirce, “Lowell Lectures of 1903”, CP 1.343–349 343.   We may say that the bulk of what is actually done consists of Secondness — or better, Secondness is the predominant character of what has been done.  The immediate … Continue reading

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C.S. Peirce • Objective Logic

Selections from C.S. Peirce, “Minute Logic” (1902), CP 2.111–118 111.   With Speculative Rhetoric, Logic, in the sense of Normative Semeotic, is brought to a close.  But now we have to examine whether there be a doctrine of signs corresponding to … Continue reading

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Ouch❢

A child hears it said that the stove is hot.  But it is not, he says; and, indeed, that central body is not touching it, and only what that touches is hot or cold.  But he touches it, and finds … Continue reading

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Pragmatic Maxim

The pragmatic maxim is a guideline for the practice of inquiry formulated by Charles Sanders Peirce. Serving as a normative recommendation or a regulative principle in the normative science of logic, its function is to guide the conduct of thought toward the achievement of its aims, advising the addressee on an optimal way of “attaining clearness of apprehension”. Continue reading

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