Functional Logic • Inquiry and Analogy • 12

Inquiry and AnalogyHigher Order Propositional Expressions

Interpretive Categories for Higher Order Propositions (n = 1)

Table 12 presents a series of interpretive categories for the higher order propositions in Table 11.  I’ll leave these for now to the reader’s contemplation and discuss them when we get two variables into the mix.  The lower dimensional cases tend to exhibit condensed or degenerate structures and their full significance will become clearer once we get beyond the 1‑dimensional case.

\text{Table 12. Interpretive Categories for Higher Order Propositions}~ (n = 1)
Interpretive Categories for Higher Order Propositions (n = 1)

Resources

cc: Conceptual GraphsCyberneticsLaws of FormOntolog Forum
cc: FB | Peirce MattersStructural ModelingSystems Science

This entry was posted in Abduction, Analogy, Argument, Aristotle, C.S. Peirce, Constraint, Deduction, Determination, Diagrammatic Reasoning, Diagrams, Differential Logic, Functional Logic, Hypothesis, Indication, Induction, Inference, Information, Inquiry, Logic, Logic of Science, Mathematics, Pragmatic Semiotic Information, Probable Reasoning, Propositional Calculus, Propositions, Reasoning, Retroduction, Semiotics, Sign Relations, Syllogism, Triadic Relations, Visualization and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Functional Logic • Inquiry and Analogy • 12

  1. Pingback: Survey of Abduction, Deduction, Induction, Analogy, Inquiry • 2 | Inquiry Into Inquiry

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