Peirce’s 1880 “Algebra Of Logic” Chapter 3 • Selection 3

Chapter 3. The Logic of Relatives (cont.)

§2. Relatives

218.   A relative is a term whose definition describes what sort of a system of objects that is whose first member (which is termed the relate) is denoted by the term;  and names for the other members of the system (which are termed the correlates) are usually appended to limit the denotation still further.  In these systems the order of the members is essential;  so that (\mathrm{A}, \mathrm{B}, \mathrm{C}) and (\mathrm{A}, \mathrm{C}, \mathrm{B}) are different systems.  As an example of a relative, take ‘buyer of ── for ── from ── ’;  we may append to this three correlates, thus, ‘buyer of every horse of a certain description in the market for a good price from its owner’.

219.   A relative of only one correlate, so that the system it supposes is a pair, may be called a dual relative;  a relative of more than one correlate may be called plural;  A non-relative term may be called a term of singular reference.

References

  • Peirce, C.S. (1880), “On the Algebra of Logic”, American Journal of Mathematics 3, 15–57.  Collected Papers (CP 3.154–251), Chronological Edition (CE 4, 163–209).
  • Peirce, C.S., Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, vols. 1–6, Charles Hartshorne and Paul Weiss (eds.), vols. 7–8, Arthur W. Burks (ed.), Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1931–1935, 1958.  Volume 3 : Exact Logic, 1933.
  • Peirce, C.S., Writings of Charles S. Peirce : A Chronological Edition, Peirce Edition Project (eds.), Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis, IN, 1981–.  Volume 4 (1879–1884), 1986.

Resources

This entry was posted in Logic, Logic of Relatives, Mathematics, Peirce, Relation Theory, Semiotics, Sign Relations, Triadic Relations and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Peirce’s 1880 “Algebra Of Logic” Chapter 3 • Selection 3

  1. Pingback: Relations & Their Relatives : 10 | Inquiry Into Inquiry

  2. Pingback: Survey of Relation Theory • 2 | Inquiry Into Inquiry

  3. Pingback: Survey of Relation Theory • 3 | Inquiry Into Inquiry

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s