Zeroth Law Of Semiotics • Discussion 1

Re: Zeroth Law Of Semiotics • Comment 2
Re: Laws of FormJohn Mingers

JM:
Hmmm
Sounds terribly like analytic philosophy to me.
There are not real philosophical problems, it’s all just a matter of misuse of words.
Have you seen the world out there — there really are problems that philosophy ought to try and help with!!!

Dear John,

If I have a philosophy it would be pragmatism.  A pragmatist — or pragmatician as I sometimes prefer — is more like a type of reflective practitioner, one who applies the pragmatic maxim to clarify ideas, all the better to apply ideas to pressing realities.

Pragmatic Maxim
The pragmatic maxim is a guideline for the practice of inquiry formulated by Charles Sanders Peirce.  Serving as a normative recommendation or regulative principle in the normative science of logic, its function is to guide the conduct of thought toward the achievement of its aims, advising the addressee on an optimal way of “attaining clearness of apprehension”.

In pragmatic ways of thinking, semiotics is a discipline of critical reflection charged with sorting out the respective roles of signs, ideas, and objects (including objects in the sense of aims, ends, goals, objectives, and purposes) in the activities of communication, learning, and reasoning.

That is what I’m about here.

Regards,

Jon

cc: CyberneticsOntolog ForumStructural ModelingSystems Science
cc: FB | Semeiotics • Laws of Form (1) (2) • Peirce List (1) (2) (3)

This entry was posted in C.S. Peirce, Denotation, Extension, Information = Comprehension × Extension, Liar Paradox, Logic, Nominalism, Peirce, Pragmatics, Rhetoric, Semantics, Semiositis, Semiotics, Sign Relations, Syntax, Zeroth Law Of Semiotics and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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